Posted in 2010-2019, Film Review

Frozen II (2019)

Image is property of Walt Disney Animation Studios

Frozen II – Film Review

Cast:  Idina Menzel, Kristen Bell, Josh Gad, Jonathan Groff, Sterling K. Brown, Evan Rachel Wood, Alfred Molina

Directors:  Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee

Synopsis: Set three years after the events of the first film, as a mysterious voice that calls out to Elsa, she must venture beyond Arendelle’s borders in search of the truth behind her powers…

Review: Cast your minds back to November 2013, the time when Frozen fever came, and quickly conquered all before it. No matter where you were, this phenomenon was inescapable as it swept across the globe, shattering box office records left, right and centre, eventually landing the title of highest grossing film of all time, a title it was to hold for six years. Furthermore, with the irresistibly catchy “Let it Go” a song that almost certainly got stuck in heads, especially those with children, several times over. It was a matter of time before Elsa’s powers brought a sequel into existence.

In the years since the events of the first film, the citizens of Arendelle are prospering under Elsa’s rule. With her relationship with Anna as strong as ever, Kristoff’s romance with Anna is going from strength to strength. Alongside them, with Kristoff’s trusted reindeer Sven and the sentient snowman Olaf by their side, all seems right with the world. However, when Elsa begins to hear a distant and mysterious voice that calls out to her, she and Anna must journey beyond Arendelle’s lands to seek out the voice that she suspects might have something to do with the origin of her powers.

Given the incredible phenomenon the preceding film became, when news that a sequel was in the works, the anticipation for it was at freezing boiling point. Taking a familiar Disney Princess trope and turning it on its head(ish), worked a treat for the first film. However, this time around they take the story into a much bolder direction. Rather than focusing on a fundamental battle of good vs evil, the screenplay recognises that the audience have grown up in the six years between the films. With that in mind, it aims to go into a much more nuanced, and mature direction. It’s an admirable approach, but despite a strong start, the plot is not as solid as its predecessor and does start to crack around half way through.

In terms of animation, Disney seldom disappoints and once again, they have delivered in some style. The animation is once again simply stunning to look at. There’s so much sophistication and detail in numerous aspects of the animation that are just make for some astounding visuals, especially when it comes to Elsa’s powers. Furthermore, what definitely helped the first film become the phenomenon it was, was down to the film’s music. Though there’s nothing here quite as powerful, or indeed as catchy as “Let it Go“, returning songwriters, Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez have come up with a number of songs go mightily close to recapture those, soaring notes. most notably “Into the Unknown” that makes the best use of Idina Menzel’s remarkable vocals.

While Olaf’s humour worked in the first film, this time around though it is very hit and miss. There’s a few instances where he can be very funny, but at other times, his humour starts to become extremely grating. Thankfully though, it’s not enough to derail the film, as despite its shortcomings from a narrative aspect, the excellent voice work, the strong sisterly bond between Elsa and Anna, and the handful of memorable tunes go a long way to ensure that this latest venture to the land of Arendelle will not give you frostbite.

The plot is not on as solid ground as its predecessor, however the stunning animation, excellent voice work and soaring music ensure that this is an adventure into the unknown, that’s worth going on.

Posted in 2010-2019, Film Review

Frozen (2013)

Image is property of Disney Animation Studios

Frozen – Film Review

Cast:  Idina Menzel, Kristen Bell, Josh Gad, Jonathan Groff, Santino Fontana, Alan Tudyk

Directors:  Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee

Synopsis: When Elsa, the Queen of Arendelle, flees in panic after the people discover her magical icy powers, her fearless sister Anna ventures after her in a bid to prevent the Kingdom from being trapped in an eternal winter…

Review: No one really does fairytale stories quite like Walt Disney Animation Studios, they certainly are the Queens (and Kings) of this particular genre of animated movies. Every time they sprinkle some of that Disney magic, especially when it’s a story focusing on a Disney Princess, or in this case a pair of Disney princesses, it’s usually a surefire winning formula and one that will resonate with audiences the world over, and maybe melt their hearts along the way.

This icy tale from the Mouse House is inspired by inspired by Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale “The Snow Queen.” Focusing on sisters Anna and Elsa, the latter of whom has magical icy powers. When they were growing up, a childhood accident forces the girls’ parents to erase Anna’s memory of her sister’s powers, causing the two of them to spend much of their lives growing up apart. As Elsa is about to be crowned Queen, an incident at her coronation triggers Elsa’s powers and turns their home of Arendelle into an unforeseen winter, causing Elsa to flee in panic. Needing Elsa to ensure Arendelle doesn’t get trapped in this eternal winter, it falls to Anna to go after her sister to save their homeland.

So often with these princess stories, there is usually a man involved. Therefore to see that cliche be flipped on its head, is extremely refreshing to see. Though it certainly wasn’t the first time that Disney has created a strong female protagonist, Elsa is nevertheless a very strong willed woman. She is firmly in charge of her own destiny, with her magical powers to help her along the way. Anna might not be as strong willed as her sister, but she is a good hearted soul determined to do whatever she can to help Elsa, and both ladies are voiced tremendously well by Idina Menzel and Kristen Bell respectively.

In terms of the supporting cast, Josh Gad gives a very memorable performance as the extremely sentient snowman Olaf. A character that could have been very hit or miss, he’s thankfully the former, as he gives the film the bulk of its laughter. The film has plenty of positive and celebratory themes, most notably about its empowerment of women, which are definitely worth celebrating. However, even when the film has really hit its stride, it cannot help but venture into some formulaic plot points. Nevertheless, as one would would expect from the Mouse House, the animation is of a very high standard. The sheer level of detail on certain items of clothing, most notably Elsa’s icy dress are extremely well detailed, not to mention Elsa’s very impressive icy powers.

Even if you had somehow never seen this film, chances are good that you would have heard the monster hit that was”Let it Go.” With its undeniably catchy tune and powerful lyrics, sung superbly by Menzel, it’s little wonder that the song scooped the Oscar for Best Original Song. Though “Let it Go” is the most popular song from the film’s soundtrack, it is just one of the many catchy songs sprinkled throughout this film that one would expect from a Disney fairytale. People the world over were struck by Frozen Fever, as it swept all before it on its way to becoming one of the highest grossing animated films of all time and it ensured that the Mouse House added another ice-solid entry to its fairytale collection.

Splendid animation but even with a strong collection of strong characters, a solid but formulaic plot prevents Frozen from melting your heart completely.